Creator of Crash Course, Hank Green, on Government

Hi Friends of CCC,

This video isn’t on the Crash Course channel, but it is worth a watch if you’re are a reader of this blog.  Hank and his brother John Greene started the whole Crash Course operation, so you might be interested in hearing one of the creators thoughts on the government, its size, and its efficiency.

The federal government is effective, efficient, and surprisingly small.

Ron Swanson gave his rebuttal:

No episode in review this week (I’m going on vacation for a few days), but come back every Thursday for a new post on a really fantastically polarizing episode of Crash Course Economics.

-Gary

The Business Cycle, Crash Course Episode #5

Economies grow and recede.  Recently, people have related economic recessions to bursting bubbles.  In 2001, the United States saw the Dot Com bubble burst, and in 2008, there we saw the housing bubble burst.  The ebbs and flows have been a part of every economy since people started keeping track of economic data.  But why does this happen?

Depending on which economic school of thought you prefer, you can have many different answers.  Communists might argue that recessions are caused by capitalists acting in their own self-interest and taking advantage of the working class.  For example, in 2008, banks were giving loans to people who could not afford to pay them back.  When people stopped paying the loans back, money that was relied on was not there, and the economy suffered.

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While this explanation of recessions (which can be summed up in one word: greed), is a catch-all for an incredibly complex economic dynamic that occurred over several years, it is not adequate.  A real look into the business cycle would explain not just how the past recession occurred, but why recessions will continue in the future.

Crash Course and Keynesianism

We mentioned before how Crash Course, while admitting that there are different theories for economic phenomena, favors one in particular for macroeconomics: Keynesianism.

To be fair, the Keynesian explanation of the business cycle is also what is taught in your average economic textbook, so we shouldn’t be too surprised.  It is explained in the video using the common analogy of a car:

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If we imagine the economy as a car, then GDP, employment, and inflation are gauges.  A car can cruise along at 65 miles per hour without overheating.  Safe cruising speed is like full employment; unemployment is low, prices are stable, and people are happy.

But if we drive that car too fast for too long, it’ll overheat.  In an economy significant spending increases GDP, causing an expansion.  Unemployment falls and factories start producing at full capacity to keep up with demand.

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Since the amount of products that can be produced is limited, people start to outbid each other, resulting in inflation.  Eventually, production costs increase as workers demand higher wages and the economy starts to slow down.  Businesses lay off a few workers.  Those workers spend less, causing the businesses that produce the goods that they would otherwise buying to lay off more workers.  

This is a contraction.  The economy is going too slow.  Eventually things stabilize, production costs fall as resources are sitting idle, and the economy starts to expand again.  This process of booms and busts is called the business cycle.

A lot of this explanation is fluff, but the essential explanation of the business cycle can be cut down to the following:

People start to outbid each other [for resources], resulting in inflation.  Eventually, production costs increase as workers demand higher wages and the economy starts to slow down.

Essentially, the price of raw materials increases, and workers demand higher wages.  The combination of the two hurts business, which starts the downturn.  Let’s take a look at these two separately: